Wednesday, January 12

Notable?


Music notes? Are they a dream?
"Mere dots on lines"  are what they seem
to unaccustomed eyes.
Some join with tails that fall or rise.
But some blobs sit, round and alone
in a space they call their own,
until we learn of the secret code's
F, A, C, E, music names. A toad,
hopping in between those lines
might search for reason or for rhyme,
but find none.
But one
who understands tonic sol-fa
soon finds there are
corresponding sounds, which,
to one with perfect pitch,
may be translated into song,
before very long.
"Do re mi
fa so la ti
do"

gives us an octave, don't you know?
Once a composer writes a score,
it's there to share for ever more,
thanks to musicians who translate
what he first heard inside his pate!

Magpie Tales #48 photo prompt supplied by Willow, as seen through the eyes of Jinksy!



Thanks to a comment from Catifsh Tales, I discovered today this delightful piece of music played on an Erhu, which I share with you here..

29 comments:

  1. Lovely! I'm passing this one on to my musician daughter.

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  2. Delightful! I learned to read music at the tender age of nine ~~~ forever grateful for that gift!

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  3. Thanks. I've tried several times to read music, cannot get it through my head.
    Good take on the prompt!
    -- K

    Kay, Alberta, Canada
    An Unfittie's Guide to Adventurous Travel

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  4. Wonderful post and great photo.

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  5. I have perfect pitch, but my brain can't make my mouth sing it!

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  6. Lovely piece, I wish I had learned the piano, maybe it is not too late.

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  7. "A toad,
    hopping in between those lines
    might search for reason or for rhyme.." I'm going to have this image in my head for some time to come.

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  8. Oh yes indeed! I am trying to sing once more- I bumble along in church...used to be able to hit some high notes and enjoy it! thanks for joining in!

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  9. This is such a clever and catchy piece..really original!

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  10. Truly, as a music lover, this is tops!

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  11. I love the way you describe in poetry form the reading musical notes, a lovely lyrical poem

    joanny

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  12. What a lovely way of putting things. I love the image of the toad hopping in between the lines.

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  13. Indeed! As one who's not musical in the least, I am awed by those who are. The notes are blobs to me! Great poem! And thanks for your comment on mine too.

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  14. So clever! I enjoyed your poem and the changes you made to the picture prompt. Well done.

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  15. Lovely. I've never learned to read music,
    so I hop about a sheet like that toad of yours.

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  16. cute..

    love your imaginations.

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  17. Dear Jinksy: Sounding like a trained musician! Particularly love;

    "Once a composer writes a score,
    it's there to share for ever more,"

    There is definitely a feeling of music being eternal! I love your rhyming scheme and the word "pate"...clever!

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  18. Oh, I love this! Wonderful read...

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  19. Woohoo!! This was super awesome! Loved the way you have explained it here..
    "F, A, C, E, music names. A toad,
    hopping in between those lines
    might search for reason or for rhyme," -- this was really awesome!! :) Fell in love with your imagery (and way with words here)..

    Totally cool!
    And those rhymes towards the end of the poem -- dig 'em!!
    A really neat take on the Magpie, Jinksy!

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  20. Reading or hearing do re mi always fills my head immediately with Julie Andrews, singing. So thanks to you my friend, the rest of the evening the Von Trapp family will be inside my head. Yikes!

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  21. Hahaha. So nice to meet you and read your very entertaining piece here. I see you've attempted to create a violin with your lines too. Or is it just me? :)
    Just a note: While teaching in China a friend had me over for dinner. Beforehand, her friend's child was learning the Erhu and played a little something for our enjoyment. Yet, the child's score was written in numbers instead of notes. The lady told me, to my surprise that this was a typically Asian way to learn music.

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  22. Catfish Tales -
    I certainly haven't attempted to create a violin, - If I had, it would have looked like one !!
    Now I shall have to go on a hunt to discover what an Erhu is...

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  23. So cute! With all those musical keys we learned long ago you made a great rhyme..

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  24. Great job on this mag pie Jinksy...very creative.

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  25. Wonderful take on the Mag. Oh do I ever remember learning to read music?! A must whether I wanted to or not!!

    A by line for Shers: yes, it is.

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  26. Why, this is poetic instruction on music instruction and what a beautiful meeting they had!

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  27. To have been schooled in music is obvious in your Magpie. Very well laid out, Jinsky!

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